Information and Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions:

Where is the Libguide of faculty resources? 

Where do I get help with Overdrive, or accessing ebooks?

Can I access databases from home?


Citation Help:

First, read General tips and tricks

I need help with citing a print book.

I need help citing a database.

I need help citing a website.

I don't know how to cite my textbook.

I don't remember my NoodleTools password.



Faculty Resources:
Tools for Teaching and Learning Libguide
How to populate Club Rosters

 
Overdrive
Students and faculty may borrow ebooks from the library through Overdrive. 
To find out how to get an ebook, watch the following tutorials:
How to log in to Overdrive
How to check out an Overdrive book


General Citation Tips and Tricks:
  • Publisher: (for databases, websites, anything!) – Always look at the bottom for a © and the publisher is next to it. If it’s not there, don’t make it up! Try the “about” page.
  • Do Not copy and paste a citation from a generator. They’re often wrong and don’t match your format.
  • If you don’t know a field – leave it blank!
  • You can tell if something is a newspaper/journal/reference by looking at where it originally appeared, usually at the bottom
  • When in doubt about what Type and level of project to make, email your teacher or chose MLA Advanced
  • Changing the font, spacing, or color of your Works Cited is also an error – all of that stuff is part of the format.
  • Always use proper capitalization, even if they don't.
  • ASK! Please! That’s what Ms. Neely is here for. 



Citing a Print Book:
  • Look on the TITLE PAGE first for the author, title of the book, publisher, and publishing city.If no author(s) has been credited, look for the editor(s) or editor(s)-in-chief.
  • For the title of the book, write only the primary title.
  • The publisher is a company, not a person. The publisher appears on the TITLE PAGE, generally before the publishing city. If more than one publishing company is provided, write the first company.
  • The publishing city generally appears on the TITLE PAGE. If the city is not on the title page, you can find it on the COPYRIGHT PAGE. If more than one publishing city is provided, write the first city. You do not need to write down the state or country.
  • The year is the book’s copyright year. Look for this symbol: © on the COPYRIGHT PAGE. If there is more than one copyright year, record the most recent year.
  • Always follow proper capitalization rules.




Citing a Print Reference Source (This includes textbooks!)
  • Look for the author’s name with the article you read. It will appear at the beginning or the end of the article, but not in the Bibliography/References section. If there is not an author of the article (there might not be!), leave this field blank.
  • The article/entry title is the name of the article you read.
  • Record the page numbers (either the span of pages or the single page).
  • The editor(s) generally appear on the TITLE PAGE. If the editors are not listed here, find them on the COPYRIGHT PAGE. Write down the names of the first two editors you see.
  • For the title of the reference book, write only the primary title.
  • For the publisher, publishing city, and year follow the same rules as a book citation. Consult a citation
  • Volume and edition are not the same thing. The volume is the book’s number in a series. The edition is the number of times the book has been revised. The edition appears on the COPYRIGHT PAGE. There may not be a volume and/or an edition. Leave these fields blank if that is the case. 



Citing a Database in General:
  • The name of the database generally appears in the BANNER. The name of the database is the specific database you used. Examples include: Global Issues in Context, Opposing Viewpoints, or Interactive Science
  • The database publisher generally appears at the very bottom of the page next to the copyright year. Look for the copyright symbol (©). If the publisher is not at the bottom of the page, it will most likely appear in the banner with the name of the database.
  • The date of access is the month, day, and year that you read the article – Just press the “today” button!
  • The date of e-publication is the copyright year. This generally appears at the bottom of the page next to the database publisher. Look for the copyright symbol (©). Remember: databases are updated constantly, so it’s generally safe to assume that the copyright year is the current year.
  • Always follow proper capitalization rules.


If you are citing Original Content in a Database (this means it's never appeared anywhere else):
  • If you cannot find the contributor (author), leave this field blank.
  • The page or article title is the name of the article you read.


If you are citing a newspaper article in a database:
  • The article title is the name of the article you read.
  • The section is the specific part of the newspaper the article is from (e.g., Sports, Fashion, Editorial). If this information is unavailable, leave the field blank.
  • The name newspaper (also known as the SOURCE), its city of publication, and its publication date are all part of the original source of the information. Ask yourself, “In what newspaper did this article originally appear?” Most newspaper’s origin cities are not listed. If this information is unavailable, leave the field blank.
  • The Edition is the specific time period in which the newspaper was issued (e.g., Evening Edition, Weekend Edition). If this information is unavailable, leave the field blank.


If you are citing a magazine article in a database:
  • If you cannot find the contributor (author), leave this field blank.
  • The article title is the name of the article you read.
  • If the original page numbers have not been indicated, leave this field blank.
  • The name of the magazine (also known as the SOURCE) and its publication date are all part of the original source of the information. Ask yourself, “In what magazine did this article originally appear?”


If you are citing a reference source from a database (this is GVRL!):
  • See notes on citing databases in general above
  • The first section is about the specific article you are citing (author of just that article, for example).  The bottom section is about the reference source as a whole, as in the whole encyclopedia (usually just lists editors).
  • If you cannot find the contributor (author), leave this field blank.
  • The page or article title is the name of the article you read.




If you are citing a website webpage:
  • The name of the website generally appears in the BANNER. This is a name, not a URL. No http://, www, or top-level domain should appear in this field. If there is a top-level domain in the website’s name, ignore it. 
  • The publisher generally appears at the very bottom of the page to the right of the copyright year. If the publisher is not at the bottom of the page, go to the website’s homepage or About page.
  • The date of e-publication is the copyright year. If there is a span of years, record the most recent year. There should only be a year written in this field!
  • The URL begins with http:// and should be written up to and including the top level domain.
  • If you cannot find the contributor (author), leave this field blank.
  • The page or article title is the name of the article you read.
  • Always follow proper capitalization rules. Ignore any fonts used in the design of the website.



If you've forgotten your NoodleTools password, please email Ms. Neely at rneely@sewickley.org.

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