History & Social Studies

The educational technology curriculum educates students to meet challenges with logic and creativity using a variety of technologies. Curricular strands in all three divisions include programming and robotics, design thinking, creative expression, and multimedia communication.

[Click on a Grade below to read the description]

List of 12 items.

  • Early Childhood (PK-K)

    In Pre-K and Kindergarten, children are introduced to the notion of the self as related to a community (town, village, city, state, nation), and different cultures around the world. The conceptual framework suggests a way for children to understand the relationship between themselves and their families to a wider world. Children become familiar with maps and globes, visual arts and music of the United States and world cultures, and learn about themselves and others through stories, films, and guests.
  • Grade 1

    Children explore what it means to be part of a community through a variety of topics and units. Citizenship in the Academy community is introduced as a way to draw on children’s experience of their first communities (families, classrooms, play groups, etc.). Children begin to understand the similarities and differences among people in their communities and around the world. The focus is on the interdependent nature of people and cultures and the concept of working together toward a common good. The adaptive nature of communities and the unique role of each individual person, including rights and responsibilities, are emphasized.
  • Grade 2

    Children learn that many different groups of people come to live and work in the USA. Focus is on the relationships among one’s self and family and one’s neighborhood, town, state, and country, as well as an awareness of the different cultural and ethnic groups in the USA. Students also learn about the natural resources available to human beings and the responsibility to conserve and sustain them.
  • Grade 3

    In Grade 3, students learn about the ecosystem of their country including natural resources, climate and weather, land forms, regions, and agriculture. They also begin to study and understand the differences among regions of the USA and each of the 50 states.
  • Grade 4

    Starting in 2016, Grade 4 will be the beginning of a three-year global studies sequence. Students will integrate their study of geography with inquiry into issues of global importance. Each global issue will be examined through case studies in two different regions of the world. Grade 4 students will investigate the challenges of health, food supply, water resources, and pollutionThrough their investigations students will focus on developing skills of discussion, research, inquiry, writing argument, and reading informational text.
  • Grade 5

    Starting in 2016, Grade 5 will be the middle of a three-year global studies sequence. Students will integrate their study of geography with inquiry into issues of global importance. Each global issue will be examined through case studies in two different regions of the world. Grade 5 students will investigate the challenges of habitat preservation, population growth, climate change, and energy resources. Through their investigations students will continue to develop skills of discussion, research, inquiry, writing argument, and reading informational text.
  • Grade 6

    Starting in 2016, Grade 6 will be the last of a three-year global studies sequence. Students will integrate their study of geography, world cultures, and history with inquiry into issues of global importance. Each global issue will be examined through case studies in two different regions of the world. 6th graders will investigate the challenges of Migration, Standard of Living, Globalization and Human Rights. Through their investigations students will develop skills of discussion, research, inquiry, writing argument and reading informational text.​
  • Grade 7

    Grade 7 history takes a thematic approach to American history. Students focus on themes such as early exploration, expansion and globalization, citizenship and identity, and protests in America. Embedded in these themes are the concepts of cause and effect and how history has affected America’s place in the world. Course goals are to focus on the application of critical thinking skills, the objective evaluation of different perspectives, and ultimately an appreciation for American history.
  • Grade 8

    Students in Grade 8 civics course study the processes and consequences of American government and politics, particularly as it relates to citizenship and action. Students study the origins of the United States government, political elections, the three branches of government, and public policy. The course material reflects current events and themes of justice, equity, and participation. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify the means by which citizens influence or resist government policies.
  • Grades 9-10

    Students in Grades 9 and 10 choose from a rich selection of trimester courses.  All students must take at least one trimester of Global Connections, Ancient Civilizations, and Modern World History by the completion of Grade 10. Students in Grade 10 who qualify and enroll in AP European History will fulfill their world history requirement.
     
    Grade 10 students may continue to select from the menu of trimester courses. All students must take at least one trimester of Global Connections, Ancient Civilizations, and Modern World History by the completion of Grade 10. Alternatively, students who qualify may enroll in the year-long course AP European History. Enrollment in this course will fulfill their World History requirement. AP European History is focused entirely on European history from the Renaissance to the modern era including the Enlightenment, political revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, World War I, and World War II to the fall of the Iron Curtain. Students enrolled in this class are required to take the AP European History examination in May.
  • Grade 11

    U.S. History is a graduation requirement. Students may choose three of four topical electives (America Comes of Age, The United States on the World Stage, The Struggle for Equality, and The U.S. Constitution, The Supreme Court and the Federal Government) or choose Advanced Placement U.S. History. All courses address the American Revolution, America’s emergence from isolation to internationalism, the wars of the 20th century, as well as topics like industrialization, immigration, civil rights, and economics. Students in AP U.S. History are required to sit for the AP exam administered by the College Board. In addition to the U.S. History requirement, some juniors choose electives from among the Grade 12 history roster.
  • Grade 12

    The Grade 12 History program offers electives in a variety of topics. Typical offerings include African Issues in Historical Perspective, Current Global Issues: Focus on Human Rights, Contemporary World Issues: Emphasis on Global Environmental Issues, East Meets West: A Study of Thought Systems and Religion from around the World, Modern Asia, and Modern Latin America.

List of 7 members.

  • Michael-Ann Cerniglia 

    Senior School History Teacher
    Clemson University - B.A.
    Clemson University - M. Ed.
  • Michael Cesario 

    Middle School History Teacher
    St. Vincent College - B.A.
    Carnegie Mellon University - M.B.A.
  • Steven Collier 

    Senior School History Teacher
    Miami University, Ohio - B.A.
    Indiana University - M.A. English Lit.
    Indiana University - Bloomington - J.D.
  • Christine Knable 

    Middle School History Teacher
    Grove City College - B.A.
    University of Pennsylvania - M.S.Ed.
  • Kate Lukaszewicz 

    University of Pittsburgh - B.A.
    Johns Hopkins University - M.A.
    Duquesne University - M.A.
  • Walter Lee McGinn 

    Senior School History Teacher
    Johns Hopkins University - B.S.
    Duquesne University - M.S.
  • Jessica Peluso 

    Chair, History Department; Senior School History Teacher
    Bucknell University - B.A.
    University of Pittsburgh - M.A.T.

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Sewickley Academy
315 Academy Avenue
Sewickley, PA 15143
Sewickley Academy is a nationally recognized Pittsburgh private school enrolling students in Pre-K through Grade 12 on a single campus.